Got The Fitness Blues? Try These Easy Tips!

Many of us begin on a fitness regimen but few of us follow through and actually reach our goal. Getting fit can be a challenge, but if you have the right motivation and right advice it can be accomplished. This article will help outline some tips on reaching your fitness goals.

If you are going to use a bench, you should always test it first. If the bench is too hard, it may cause a misalignment in your spine that can weaken your arm. Test the bench by pushing a thumb into the padding. If you can feel the wood underneath the padding, find a better bench to use.

Staying active is the key to maintaining ones fitness. Finding what ever exercise one prefers best can help one maintain their levels of exercise and ensure that they stay active. A body that stays active its whole life can age gracefully ensuring that one will stay fit through out their lives.

Workout in front of a mirror. Keeping good form while exercising is very important in order to achieve maximum fitness results. By working out in front of a mirror, you can monitor your posture and stance to make sure that you are performing the exercise properly. Maintaining proper form will help your muscles to build evenly.

Fitness can be addictive and necessary in your every day life once you can clearly identify the ways it is making you feel healthier, and an overall more energetic person. Exercising every day just adds to your fitness plan and to your lifestyle. Working out every day can become a part of your every day routine.

A great tip to keep you motivated to do your exercise sessions is to pay your trainer in advance. If you have paid, you will be more inclined to continue with your workout sessions. You will not want to waste your money but not following through. Since your trainer is already paid, it will give you a reason to go work out.

Focus on a plan and stick to it. Working on plans such as a upper body/lower body split can be beneficial to serious fitness because it helps portions of the body rest on off days. Muscles are living cells and grow during periods of intense stress, exercise in this case. This growth, however, requires a rest period; the rest period is an important feature of our body that upper/lower splits make a note of.

A good way to help you get fit is to count your calories. Knowing how many calories you consume a day is key because it determines whether you’ll lose weight or gain weight. By keeping your calories at maintenance level or less, and losing calories through exercise, you’ll be fit in no time.

Having read this article you should now be one step closer to your fitness goals. Knowledge is power, and now you are empowered to actually attempt to tackle your goals. Being fit is no easy task, but now it has been facilitated, so get to the gym and start applying everything you have learned.

What Needs to be Done to End Homelessness?

Featured

Noreen date of birth ? death was in 2012, she loved music any-kind of good music. She loved to party and that she did until the end.

An adequate supply of safe, affordable and appropriate housing is a prerequisite to truly ending homelessness in the long term. This includes ensuring that people who are chronically and episodically homeless are prioritized and that systems are in place to enable such persons to receive housing and supports through Housing First programs. In a tight housing market, implementing a Housing First agenda becomes that much more challenging. It is also important to address the supply of affordable housing, in order to broaden access for other priority populations, including women fleeing violence, Aboriginal Peoples, families, seniors and youth, for instance.

Ultimately, addressing Canada’s housing crisis comes down to money, which then begs the question about our national priorities.

Canadian homeowners enjoy over $8.6 billion in annual tax and other benefits. This kind of investment in home ownership is important because it benefits millions of middle-income households.

Spending on affordable housing for Canada’s poorest households however, is less than one quarter of that invested in homeownership, approximately $2.1 billion per year and has declined quite dramatically over the past 25 years.

Ironically, it costs more to ignore our housing problem than it would to fix it. Consider the estimate that homelessness alone costs the Canadian economy over $7 billion per year. While the Government of Canada invests $119 million annually to address homelessness through the Homelessness Partnering Strategy (provinces and municipalities also invest), this is not sufficient to address the problem and as a result has not led to a noticeable reduction in homelessness.

By not investing adequately in housing for the poorest Canadians, health care, justice and other taxpayer-funded costs increase.

Put another way, as Canadians, we are spending more money on people who do not need help compared to those in greatest need. And by not spending on those in greatest need, we are not only creating hardship for many Canadian families, we are creating a considerably larger expense for the Canadian economy.

We can do things differently. In the State of Homelessness in Canada 2014, we propose a robust housing investment strategy that would cost the economy much less than the current costs of homelessness. The key elements of our strategy include the following proposals:

 

 

continue reading on this link

Got The Fitness Blues? Try These Easy Tips!

Blues ?

Many of us begin on a fitness regimen but few of us follow through and actually reach our goal. Getting fit can be a challenge, but if you have the right motivation and right advice it can be accomplished. This article will help outline some tips on reaching your fitness goals.

If you are going to use a bench, you should always test it first. If the bench is too hard, it may cause a misalignment in your spine that can weaken your arm. Test the bench by pushing a thumb into the padding. If you can feel the wood underneath the padding, find a better bench to use.

Staying active is the key to maintaining ones fitness. Finding what ever exercise one prefers best can help one maintain their levels of exercise and ensure that they stay active. A body that stays active its whole life can age gracefully ensuring that one will stay fit through out their lives.

Workout in front of a mirror. Keeping good form while exercising is very important in order to achieve maximum fitness results. By working out in front of a mirror, you can monitor your posture and stance to make sure that you are performing the exercise properly. Maintaining proper form will help your muscles to build evenly.

Jacques Sayagh

Jacques Sayagh

Fitness can be addictive and necessary in your every day life once you can clearly identify the ways it is making you feel healthier, and an overall more energetic person. Exercising every day just adds to your fitness plan and to your lifestyle. Working out every day can become a part of your every day routine.

A great tip to keep you motivated to do your exercise sessions is to pay your trainer in advance. If you have paid, you will be more inclined to continue with your workout sessions. You will not want to waste your money but not following through. Since your trainer is already paid, it will give you a reason to go work out.

Focus on a plan and stick to it. Working on plans such as a upper body/lower body split can be beneficial to serious fitness because it helps portions of the body rest on off days. Muscles are living cells and grow during periods of intense stress, exercise in this case. This growth, however, requires a rest period; the rest period is an important feature of our body that upper/lower splits make a note of.

A good way to help you get fit is to count your calories. Knowing how many calories you consume a day is key because it determines whether you’ll lose weight or gain weight. By keeping your calories at maintenance level or less, and losing calories through exercise, you’ll be fit in no time.

Having read this article you should now be one step closer to your fitness goals. Knowledge is power, and now you are empowered to actually attempt to tackle your goals. Being fit is no easy task, but now it has been facilitated, so get to the gym and start applying everything you have learned.

Ontario Resources

Hamilton

Emergency Shelters for Men

Good Shepherd Centre
905-528-9109
135 Mary Street, Box 1003,
Hamilton, ON L8N 3R1

Emergency shelter for men in need of temporary accommodation. A daily hot meal is served for non-residents as well. Bag lunch available, also a food bank. Clothing and household items available if needed.

Mission Services Men’s Residence
905-528-7635
325 James Street North,
Hamilton, ON L8L 1H3

Programs available to adult men experiencing a crisis in housing, clothing, finances, and personal well-being. Also emergency men’s shelter.

Booth Centre Single Men’s Hostel
905-527-1444
94 York Boulevard,
Hamilton, ON L8R 1R6

Emergency shelter for men. Provides a bag lunch. Also a daily traveling meal van stopping at several downtown locations between 9 pm and midnight. Call for schedule

Emergency Shelters for Women

Interval House
Crisis Line: 905-387-8881
Business Line: 905-387-9959

A transition house for battered/abused women and their children. Provides meals, emergency clothing and personal needs, 7 days a week.

Martha House
Crisis Line: 905-523-6277
Business Line: 905-523-8895

Emergency family shelter specializing in the care of victims of domestic violence. 28 bed security-equipped transition house for women and children in crisis.

Mary’s Place
905-540-8000

9 bed emergency shelter for homeless women 18 years and older who may experience difficulty in accessing the shelter system.

Native Women’s Centre
905-522-1501

Provides safe emergency shelter for all women regardless of age, ancestry, culture, place of origin or sexual orientation, with or without children, who are experiencing a crisis in their lives due to family violence, homelessness, or conflict with the law.

Inasmuch House
Crisis Line: 905-529-8600
Business Line: 905-529-8149

Emergency shelter for abused and homeless women and their children, as well as female teenagers over the age of 16.
Emergency Shelters for Youth (Ages 16-21)

Notre Dame House
905-308-8090
14 Cannon Street West,
Hamilton, ON L8R 3B3

There are 11 beds available for males and 9 beds available for females. Laundry facilities and meals are provided. Additional services are provided through their resource centre from 9-5 p.m. daily. These include school, employment counselling, addictions counsellings, public health nurse.

http://www.hamilton.ca/HealthandSocialServices/SocialServices/Housing/emergencyShelters.htm

OTTAWA

Here is a list of resources for homeless people in the Ottawa area. Inside, you will find links to food, shelter, and other information. Please suggest a link.

Shelters
Catholic Immigration Services provides temporary accomodations, food, clothing, information, counselling, orientation workshops, and translation services.
Contact: (613) 789-4338
http://www.cic.ca

John Howard Society of Ottawa provides a structured home-like environment for people who require help making transitions (ie:employment, education)(613) 236-3077
http://www.ottawa.johnhoward.ca

National Capital Region YMCA/YWCA
provides single adults with partly furnished rooms for monthly rental, health and wellness facility membership, local phone services; to provide adults and families: accomodations, local phone services, facility access, food money; To provide youth aged 16 to 19 with furnished room, phone and gym access, life skills programs, and goal-setting and achievement program; and to provide on a user pay basis referrals to a budget hotel on nightly or weekly basis for crisis or transient use.
Contact: (613) 788-5063
http://www.educom.on.ca/ymca-ywca/

Shepard’s of Good Hope provides shelter, food, addiction recovery programs, and supportive housing.
Contact: (613) 789-8210
www.shepherdsofgoodhope.com

Youth Services Bureau of Ottawa-Carleton provides rent-geared-to-income housing for youth; and works to re-integrate residents back into the community.
Contact: (613) 729-1000
http://www.ysb.on.ca

Women’s Shelters
Centre Espoir Sophie est une halte accueil qui offre un soutien pratique (repas, paniers de nourriture, produits hygiéniques, buanderie, coupes de cheveux) et émotionnel (accompagnement, écoute, ateliers et activités) aux femmes et à leurs enfants.
Contact: (613) 789-5119
www.centreespoirsophie.ca

Interval House of Ottawa-Carleton provides temporary shelter for women and there children who are escaping domestic violence.
Contact: (613) 234-8511

Harmony House provides medium-term supportive housing for women and their children, who have survived violent relationships.
Contact: (613) 233-3386
www.harmonyhousews.com

Cornerstone / Pilier provides emergency shelter and supportive housing for a of women.
Contact: (613) 237-4669
http://www.alexhoughton.com/cornerstone/

Food

Shepard’s of Good Hope provides food to those in need.
Contact: (613) 789-8210
www.shepherdsofgoodhope.com

Carlington Community and Health Services provides a walk-in clinic, employment guidance; youth programs; newcomers support and nutrition and cooking together.
Contact: (613) 722-4000

Sandy Hill Community Health Centre provides the opportunity for the group to cook and eat a meal together and take food home, along with vitamins and milk vouchers, and helps with babysitting of older children. Also provides bus tickets.
Contact: (613) 789-1500
http://www.sandyhillchc.on.ca

Medical Services
Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) Advocate and provide client-directed services and programs with and for people with mental health problems. Enhance, promote and maintain the mental health of individuals and communities through education and awareness.
Contact: 613-737-7791
http://www.cmhaottawa.ca/

Carlington Community and Health Services
Provides a walk-in clinic, employment guidance; youth programs; newcomers support and nutrition and cooking together.
Contact: (613) 722-4000

Centretown Community Health Centre Support for people living on the street or in shelters; health care, outreach and assistance to obtain a health card. Support for people without health insurance.
Contact: (613) 233-4443

Ottawa Inner City Health Project Provide health care services to men and women who are chronically homeless and unable to use regular services due to lifestyle or complex health needs. Four main health services are provided to chronically homeless individuals in Ottawa’s downtown core:
Contact: (613) 562-4500
http://www.med.uottawa.ca/ichpsuo/Home_Page.htm

Royal Ottawa Hospital Our mission is to look for better ways to improve the delivery of services to better meet the needs of the homeless and mentally ill populations.
Contact: (613) 722-6521 x6
http://www.rohcg.on.ca

Somerset West Community Health Centre Provides clients with primary health care, education, technical training, life skills, and employment skills that are tied to today’s world.
Contact: (613) 238-8210
www.swchc.on.ca

Miscellaneous

Alliance to End Homelessness A coalition of community stakeholders committed to working collaboratively to eliminate homelessness by gaining a better understanding of homelessness and developing and implementing strategies to end it
Contact: (613) 241-7913 x 205

Centre 507 Association of Ottawa Provides services to people who are disadvantaged both economically and socially, responding to their changing needs through a variety of free programs.
Contact: (613) 233-5626
http://centre507.ncf.ca/

Financial and Employment Support Provides financial assistance in emergency situations, offering numerous services and programs for senior citizens, immigrants/refugees, the disabled, the homeless, and others.
Contact: (613) 580-2400
http://city.ottawa.on.ca

Housing Help (Ottawa) Assists homeless families and individuals living in shelters in finding find affordable housing.
Contact: (613) 563-4532
http://www.housinghelp.on.ca

National Anti-Poverty Organization Works to ensure that the concerns of low-income people in Canada are heard and respected.
Contact: (613) 789-0096
http://www.napo-onap.ca/

Rideau Street Youth Enterprises Creating opportunities for street and at-risk youth to develop the practical skills and experience they need to enter (or re-enter) the work force, and to become active, contributing members of the local community.
Contact: (613) 562-3864

Salvation Army Offers rehabilitation to men suffering from drug and alcohol addiction through a residential twelve-step recovery program and other addiction services; assists men who are homeless or living in poverty in achieving a substance abuse free lifestyle.
Contact: (613) 241-1573

TORONTO

http://www.211toronto.ca/splash.jsp
your connection to information about community, social, health and government services.

http://ootc.ca/
The Out Of The Cold program provides emergency food and overnight shelter during winter months.

Homeless Nation Toronto’s community partners.

http://www.youthlink.ca/innercity.htm
Youth Link Inner City provides drop-in and outreach services to street involved and homeless youth.

http://sketch.ca/
Working arts for street involved and homeless youth.

http://www.stchrishouse.org/adults/meeting-place/
The Meeting Place offers drop-in services to homeless and underhoused adults.

The Parkdale Activity – Recreation Centre offers drop-in and outreach supports to psychiatric survivors and socially isolated adults.

http://tdrc.net/index.php?page=home

Toronto Disaster Relief Committee
Political advocacy group working to end homelessness with a national housing strategy, and to relieve suffering of homeless people by advocating for better emergency relief measures in Toronto, including increased shelter space and public health services * no individual case work

http://ocap.ca/
Ontario Coalition Against Poverty
Direct action anti-poverty organization * campaigns against regressive government policies * advocates for individuals facing eviction, termination of social assistance & deportation.

http://homelessnation.org/en/node/336

Manitoba Resources

WINNIPEG

Here is a list of resources for homeless people in the Winnipeg area. Inside, you will find links to food, shelter, and other information. Please suggest a link.

Shelters

Main Street Project, Inc.
provides crisis, shelter, transitional housing, Detox, and detention area for intoxicated persons.
Contact: (204) 982-8260
http://www.mainstreetproject.ca

Ndinawe
provides emergency shelter and counseling services for runaway youth.
Contact: (204) 586-2588

Women’s Shelters

Native Women’s Transition Centre
is a community-based, 21 bed facility providing support and services to Aboriginal women and children. Program and service philosophy is to strengthen and support Native women who have experienced victimization to become self-sufficient.
Contact: (204) 989-8240

Ikwe-Widdjiitiwin is a crisis shelter that provides safe accommodation, supportive counselling and advocacy to abused Aboriginal women and their children. Other services include a non-residential program and 24 hour provincial crisis line counselling.
Contact: (204) 987-2780

Food
Agape Table Inc. serves the needs of the hungry in the inner city of Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Contact: 204-786-2370
www.agapetable.ca

Powerhouse Winnipeg is a non-profit community organization that provides emergency and support services to street involved youth aged 16-29. We operate a drop-in center where we offer peer support, referrals, advocacy, a free store (clothing, blankets, shoes etc), outreach, Internet, laundry facilities, food, an on site Public Health Nurse (one afternoon a week), and telephone access for job and housing searches.
Contact: 204-953-1310

Siloam Mission is a faith-based agency that serves 500 – 900 poor and homeless a day, at no cost or preconditions through its: meal program, food bank, clothing bank, counseling, emergency shelter, agency referrals, employment-training programs (with paid positions), health centre (which provides primary care, dental, physiotherapy, massage & chiropractic, footcare, and health education), income tax preparations, a 12 step recovery program, addictions meetings & groups, access to phone, postal mail service, a book program, optional spiritual services, haircuts, etc.
Contact: 204-956-4344
www.siloam.ca

additional resources for Winnipeg found at
Resource Assistance for Youth
http://www.rayinc.ca/

====================================
http://homelessnation.org/node/338

B.C. man not guilty of welfare fraud

Vanderhoof – A man accused of stealing $50,000 in welfare money may have been living as “buddies with benefits” with another man, but a BC judge has ruled there was no proof that the two men were living in a common-law relationship.

The finding was key to provincial court Judge Darrell O’Byrne’s decision to throw out a fraud charge against Gordon Street of Vanderhoof.

Street was charged over accusations he received too much social assistance money, with the Crown arguing he failed to disclose he was in a common-law relationship with another man.

Street collected $50,000 over a period of five years beginning in 2001.

In September 2001, Street said he was single and never married on his assistance review, although he claimed to be living with someone at least twice while making claims for financial help.

Saskatchewan Indigent Resources

REGINA

Here is a list of resources for homeless people in the Regina area. Inside, you will find links to food, shelter, and other information. Please suggest a link.

    Shelters

•HI-Turgeon International Hostel costs approx. $31/first night; $29 additional night.
Check-in: 7:00-10:00am.5:00pm-10:00pm
2310 McIntyre St.
Contact: 791-8165

•Soul’s Harbour Rescue Mission serves single men, single women and families. No cost.
Book-in time: 5:00pm
Men’s only shelter: 1836 Halifax St.
Women’s only shelter: 1610 Angus St.
Contact: 543-0011

•YWCA Isabel Johnson Women’s Shelter for women and children fleeing domestic abuse.
Hours: 24 hours
1940 McIntyre St.
Contact: 525-2141 (24 hr crisis line)

•YWCA Kikinaw Women’s Only Residence $45.00/nightly; $350.00/monthly
1940 McIntyre
Contact: 525-2141

•YMCA Men’s Residence men only. First come, first served. $39.50/night; $103.67/week; $328.60/month
Hours: Monday-Friday 5:45am-10:00pm / Saturday-Sunday 7:00am-7:00pm
2400 13th Avenue
Phone: 757-9622 ext.257

•Wichihik Safe House (WISH) for women and children fleeing domestic abuse.
Hours: 24 hours
Phone: 543-0493

•Waterston Centre provides temporary shelter for men. Different support services are available. Food is also available for those in need twice a week.
Hours: 24 hours
Book-in time: after 4:00pm
Phone: (306) 569-6088
Website: Waterson Centre

•YWCA of Regina provides emergency shelter, affordable long-term accommodation, childcare and fitness programs, violence interventions.
Contact: (306) 525-2141 x119
YWCA of Regina

Women’s Shelters
•Gemma House provides a safe, stable residential setting for female youth.
Contact: Tel: (306) 586-5388; E-mail: gemmahouse@accesscomm.ca

•Regina Transition House offers short-term shelter and several services including transportation to school and appointments. Also provides public education programs.
Hours: 24 hours
Box 1364, Regina
Contact: 569-2292

    Food

•Albert Scott Community Center serves everyone. Free bread: Monday-Friday after 11:00am
1264 Athol St.
Contact: (303) 777-7033

•Carmichael Outreach Inc. Free bread from 10:00am-noon. Clothing pick-up during regular hours.
Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00am-noon/1:00pm-4:00pm
1925 Osler St.
Contact: (303) 757-2235

•Celebration Lutheran Church sermon, food and, at times, clothing hamper. Must phone first with Social Insurance Number and other information. Serves everyone.
3130 Renfrew Cres.
Contact: (303) 789-2727

•Indian Metis Christian Fellowship serves everyone. Coffee and donut everyday; Soup and Bannock served every Wednesday at noon (Cost: $2.00). Clothing pick-up Thursday 10:00am-1:00pm.
Hours: Monday-Thursday 9:00am-1:30pm/Friday 9:00am-noon
3131 Dewdney Ave.
Contact: (303) 359-1096

•North Central Family Center serves everyone.
Hours: Wednesday after 3:00pm/Thursday 1:30-2:30pm/Friday 1:30-2:30pm
2931 5th Avenue
Contact: (303) 347-2552

•Rainbow Youth Center Serves youth 11-19 years old.
Hours: Monday-Friday at 4:45pm
977 McTavish St.
Contact: (303) 757-9743

•Regina Food Bank offers food hampers, clothing and furniture. Educational programs are also available. Free bread during regular hours.
425 Winnipeg St.
Hours: Monday-Friday: 9:30am-12:30pm/1:30pm-4:00pm
Contact: (306) 791-6533
www.reginafoodbank.ca

•Soul’s Harbour Rescue Mission serves everyone.
Hours: Monday-Friday 4:00pm-coffee/5:00pm-supper
1836 Halifax St.
Contact: (303) 543-0011

•St.Paul Cathedral serves everyone.
Hours: 7:00am-free breakfast
1861 McIntyre St.
Contact: (303) 522-6439

•Visitation House serves women only. Drop in bread everyday; clothing for women and children sometimes available. Information, referrals, telephone, educational programs.
Hours: Monday-Thursday 10:00am-2:00pm
900- 11th Avenue
Contact: (306)352-0016 // E-mail: visithouse@sasktel.net
Visitation House website

•Waterston House serves men only – ID necessary.
Hours: 24 hours; free lunch Sunday 12:15-1:00pm
1845 Osler St.
Contact: 569-6088

    Needle Exchange

•Carmichael Outreach Inc
Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00am-noon/1:00pm-4:30pm
1925 Osler St.
Phone: 757-2235

•Red Ribbon Place All Nation’s Hope AIDS Network
Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00am-4:30pm
2735 5th Avenue
Phone: 1-800-210-7266 or 924-8429

•Street Project Van circulates. Call for hours and locations.
Phone: 766-7799

•Needle Drop Off Boxes 5th Avenue in alley between Cameron and garnet; and in alley behind 1800 Toronto Street.

    Miscellaneous

•Regina Anti-Poverty Ministry A social justice agency that operates in downtown Regina. RAPM’s work can be identified in three areas: 1) individual advocacy, where the needs of individuals in conflict with the system are supported, 2) public education, where conferences and workshops are combined with academic research to raise awareness within the general public on poverty issues, and 3) systemic advocacy, where deficiencies within the system are identified and addressed by campaigns and presentations to the governing bodies.

Contact:
2330 Victoria Avenue
Regina, SK
S4P 0S6
Tel: (306) 352-6386; E-Mail: rapm@sasktel.net
or
Bonnie Morton
Tel: (306) 352-6386

•Marion Centre Clothing pick-up Friday, noon-12:45pm. Men only, closed Thursday/Sunday.
Hours: Monday, Wednesday,Friday, Saturday: 10:00am-2:00pm
1835 Halifax Street
Phone: 757-0073

Community Care

•Al Ritchie Health Action Centre has a nurse on staff.
Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00am-4:45pm; Tuesday afternoons by appointment only
325 Victoria Avenue
Phone: 766-7660

•Four Directions Primary Care Clinic has a nurse on staff.
Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00am-4:00pm by drop-in or appointment.
3501 5th Avenue
Phone: 766-7540

_________________________________________

SASKATOON

Salvation Army Community Centre.

The shelter can provide one night of free accommodation in an emergency and provide meals in the morning. They also have a program where someone can get 12 free meals each calendar month provided that they have I.D.

Contact:
339 Avenue C South
S7M 1N5
(306) 242-6833

From: http://homelessnation.org/en/node/339

Homeless Shelters in Alberta

Homeless persons and families can access emergency shelters across Alberta. There are 3 types of shelter accommodation:

■ Emergency Shelters: means overnight accommodation to individuals who have no permanent address.

■ Short-Term Supportive Housing: means temporary housing with support to assist client movement into permanent housing.

■ Long-Term Supportive Housing: means unlimited stay at a facility that provides 24/7 support to its residents.

In the 2011-12 fiscal year, the province committed $38.5 million to support agencies providing shelter spaces. Funding was allocated to 29 emergency shelters that provide 3,302 spaces across the province. The following charts list these facilities by community and shelter type.

Shelter space usage has gone down in all major cities in Alberta and there will be a reduced need for emergency shelter spaces as more and more homeless people are provided with permanent housing. However, as there continues to be a need for emergency accommodations the Alberta government continues to support about 3,500 emergency shelter spaces in 30 facilities across Alberta.

Edmonton Emergency Shelters

Hope Mission
9908-106 Avenue 780-422-2018 310 spaces

Herb Jamieson Centre
10014-105A Avenue 780-429-3470 215 spaces

Salvation Army Addictions and Residential Centre
9611-102 Avenue 780-429-4274 142 spaces

Women’s Emergency Accommodation Centre
9611-101A Avenue 780-423-5302 66 spaces

Edmonton Short-Term Supportive Housing

Hope Mission Edwardson Place
10336-114 Street 780-453-3412 20 spaces

E4C Elizabeth House
11717-93 Street 780-378-0611 20 spaces

Edmonton Long-Term Supportive Housing

McCauley Lodge
9520-108 Avenue 780-408-2996 58 spaces

Sparling Lodge
9540-110A Avenue 780-408-2985 20 spaces

Urban Manor
9524-104 Avenue 780-425-5901 75 spaces

Fort McMurray Emergency Shelters

Fort McMurray Salvation Army
9919 MacDonald Avenue 780-743-4135 32 spaces

WBHDC Marshall House
10095 Marshall Street 780-715-1870 70 spaces

Grande Prairie Emergency Shelters

Wapiti Community Dorm
Rotary House 10101-97A Street 780-513-4043 62 spaces

Grande Prairie Short-Term Supportive Housing

Elders Caring
9702-99 Avenue 780-882-7242 17 spaces

Wapiti Community Dorm
Rotary House 10101-97A Street 780-513-4043 16 spaces

Lloydminster Emergency Shelters

Lloydminster Social Action Coalition
5001-48 Avenue 306-825-3977 20 spaces

Red Deer Emergency Shelters

Central Alberta Housing Society – People’s Place Shelter
6002-54 Avenue 403-342-4722 23 spaces

Calgary Emergency Shelters

Calgary Drop-In & Rehab Centre
Riverfront location 423-4 Avenue SE 403-263-5707 700 spaces
Hillhurst location Contact Riverfront 100 spaces

The Salvation Army of Canada
Wagner Place 3013-15 Avenue SW 403-410-1111 12 spaces for women
Centre of Hope 20-9 Avenue SE 403-410-1111 159 spaces

The Mustard Seed Society (Foothills)
7025-44 Street SE 403-269-1319 300 spaces

Calgary Alpha House Society
203-15 Avenue SE 403-234-7388 120 spaces

YWCA – Mary Dover House
320-5 Avenue SE 403-232-1588 6 spaces

Calgary Short-Term Supportive Housing

Calgary Dream Centre
4510 Macleod Trail S 403-243-5598 120 spaces

YWCA – Mary Dover House
320-5 Avenue SE 403-232-1588 80 spaces

Calgary Drop-In & Rehab Centre
423-4 Avenue SE 403-263-5707 270 spaces

Calgary Long-Term Supportive Housing
Trinity Place Foundation of Alberta – Peter Coyle Place
5700-3 Street SW 403-252-5329 70 spaces

Medicine Hat Emergency Shelters

Medicine Hat Salvation Army Family Support Centre
737-8 Street SE 403-527-2474 30 spaces

Lethbridge Emergency Shelters

Aboriginal Housing Society
1205-3 Avenue South 403-328-2414 80 spaces

Lethbridge Short-Term Supportive Housing
Blackfoot Family Lodge Society
830-7 Street North 403-329-6506 15 spaces

Created:
Modified: 2012-07-20
from : http://humanservices.alberta.ca/homelessness/14633.html