This Is Not Racist?

If this picture is offensive to you, donate 1$.  If a billion dollar a year company can produce top notch commercials to present their product to the public, that same company should put as much emphasis on it’s personnel’s education.

Said company is quite good at educating mass populations into their stores with the promise of a better life.  The reality is harsh.

This is an experiment to assess how many people still find this image unsettling.  And along with your dollar, please leave a comment as to why this image is offensive.

 

 

A WalMart employee celebrating Hallowe’en in Blackface.

Hello Out There

You wonder sometimes if there is really anybody out there? Do you ever get that feeling that there is, I know I do – and in these days and times it seems not even God is enough or rather faith in God. Are we alone in this vast Universe have we turned our backs on God or has God turned it’s back on us. Mankind professes to know so much, The Big Bang , went from a “theory” to a factoid even-though there is no real way to prove or disprove that theory.

So here we are in 2018 staring down an unknown but a seemingly apocalyptic future, man wants to be the creator of his own Universe. There is no insurance policy that protects this Earth in case of destruction. There is only faith, you either have it or you don’t, if you don’t have faith there is a certain emptiness that pervades your every waking moment.

If I had known what I know now then would I have chosen the same path? Was a life of unrighteousness worth the pain of the memory of so much gone wrong and spoiled bad and rotten. Losing ones faith to mediocrity and popular-ism seeking fame and fortune leads to the same 6 foot hole that a nameless vagrant lies in with no headstone.

We humans are so smart we can demand that it be as we say or we will make it so, and like Children arguing with a parent we think we get our way until we realize that we don’t. It was a smart creator that put the things in the Universes so far out of reach – when God thinks mankind is ready we will be free of the bonds of Earth, free to roam the stars and with Gods blessing.

 

What Needs to be Done to End Homelessness?

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Noreen date of birth ? death was in 2012, she loved music any-kind of good music. She loved to party and that she did until the end.

An adequate supply of safe, affordable and appropriate housing is a prerequisite to truly ending homelessness in the long term. This includes ensuring that people who are chronically and episodically homeless are prioritized and that systems are in place to enable such persons to receive housing and supports through Housing First programs. In a tight housing market, implementing a Housing First agenda becomes that much more challenging. It is also important to address the supply of affordable housing, in order to broaden access for other priority populations, including women fleeing violence, Aboriginal Peoples, families, seniors and youth, for instance.

Ultimately, addressing Canada’s housing crisis comes down to money, which then begs the question about our national priorities.

Canadian homeowners enjoy over $8.6 billion in annual tax and other benefits. This kind of investment in home ownership is important because it benefits millions of middle-income households.

Spending on affordable housing for Canada’s poorest households however, is less than one quarter of that invested in homeownership, approximately $2.1 billion per year and has declined quite dramatically over the past 25 years.

Ironically, it costs more to ignore our housing problem than it would to fix it. Consider the estimate that homelessness alone costs the Canadian economy over $7 billion per year. While the Government of Canada invests $119 million annually to address homelessness through the Homelessness Partnering Strategy (provinces and municipalities also invest), this is not sufficient to address the problem and as a result has not led to a noticeable reduction in homelessness.

By not investing adequately in housing for the poorest Canadians, health care, justice and other taxpayer-funded costs increase.

Put another way, as Canadians, we are spending more money on people who do not need help compared to those in greatest need. And by not spending on those in greatest need, we are not only creating hardship for many Canadian families, we are creating a considerably larger expense for the Canadian economy.

We can do things differently. In the State of Homelessness in Canada 2014, we propose a robust housing investment strategy that would cost the economy much less than the current costs of homelessness. The key elements of our strategy include the following proposals:

 

 

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